Word on the street is that a girl can never have too many shoes.

This girl can never have too many bikes.  I love bikes.

When I was moving from my Redondo Beach apartment to nowhere, what made me cry was not being homeless, but I lost it when a blonde woman almost purchased my beach bike.  I just couldn't let go of my mint green.

Biking gives me a sense of exhiliartion, and when I'm pedaling up the Palos Verdes hills, a smile of soul happiness spreads across my face.  I'll say it again, I just love bikes!  I often do the rubber-necking double look when I see a hot bike, which I'm sure is confused by the handler as me checking out their spandexed, hipster, or surfer self (that's just an added, but unnecessary bonus.  I'm into your bike).

I think driving is stupid, or in other words, I just really hate driving.  I think it's genetic, because if for some odd reason, I go on road trips with my family, it's a fight to see who HAS to drive.  No one wants to take the wheel.  The price of gasoline diminishing an entire paycheck (at least for a flight attendant), is just another reason why a bike is a better option.  I'm saddened that the public transportation system in the United States is not more developed.  Europe has its act together when it comes to public transportation and biking.  Many European cities have these popular bike sharing systems, a service in which bicycles are made available by the city to be shared by residents or visitors who do not own them.

When I was in Barcelona last January, I was made aware of this fantastic concept.  Bike stations are located throughout different areas of the city, and subscribers put in a pass code and use a bike for "free" for a specified amount of time, and then once that time is expired, the rider is then charged an amount per hour in addition to the initial subscriptions.  Systems vary slightly from city to city, as in Barcelona, you must be a resident, whereas other European cities like Paris and Amsterdam, visitors may use the citywide bike share program.

While in Slovenia, I took advantage of Ljubljana's (pronounced Lube-lee-ah-nuh) bike share program, testing out the popular concept for the first time.  Inexpensive, accessible, and almost idiot proof, it was an enjoyable and simple way see the local area.

How it works in Slovenia is you go to the Bicikelj website to sign up, choosing between a year or one week subscription, which is 3 or 1 euro, respectively.  You will receive a pass code that you will use every time that you check out a bike at one of the stations.  Read over the terms, conditions, and use policy, and remember your credit card is information is held and you will be charged for a missing bike or for any use after the first hour.  After paying the 1 euro for my week subscription, I didn't have to pay any other fees, as I was sure to return my bike to a station within the hour, and if I still wanted to ride around, I would simply check out a different bike.

I love this concept and really wish it would catch on in Hermosa Beach, but until it does catch on in your local neighborhood, next time you are in Ljubljana or Amsterdam or any other city that uses bike shares, try it out.  You'll have fun!

And yes, I do think that your bike is sexy:)

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